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Amber Kennedy Madole
USC Gould School of Law

Amber Kennedy Madole

Law Librarian, Research Services, Indigenous Law and Policy, and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law

Email:
699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA Room: 203B

Last Updated: February 24, 2022




Amber Madole serves as law librarian for research services and Indigenous law and policy and adjunct assistant professor of law at the USC Gould School of Law. In these roles, she teaches legal research courses and assists faculty and students with their legal research endeavors.

Madole earned her undergraduate degree at Georgetown University in immigration policy and regional studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service. While at Georgetown, she worked for U.S. Senator Jeff Bingaman in both the D.C. and New Mexico offices and established a book sharing program between the Library of Congress and rural New Mexico libraries.

During law school, Madole was the managing editor of the Indigenous Peoples’ Journal of Law, Culture & Resistance. She spent time at a midsize immigration law firm and clerked for the State Bar of California, the Los Angeles City Attorney’s Office, and the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office.

Madole is active in the Southern California Association of Law Libraries (SCALL), having served on the executive board and chairing the Speakers Committee for the annual SCALL Institute.

Madole has a special dedication to the study of Indigenous law and policy issues. She is the author of California Tribal Law in Henke's California Law Guide. Her joint proposal promoting the inclusion of tribal codes in the Bluebook was sponsored by ALL-SIS, the academic special interest section for the American Association of Law Libraries. She is a citizen of the Chiricahua Fort Sill Apache Tribe and a member of the State Bar of California. 

Articles and Book Chapters

  • "California Tribal Law," in Henke's California Law Guide (Daniel W. Martin, ed.) (Matthew Bender, 2006).

FACULTY IN THE NEWS

Bloomberg Government
June 22, 2022
Re: Franita Tolson

Franita Tolson was interviewed about how federal lawsuits from North Carolina, Alabama, and Arkansas test the limits of the Voting Rights Act, the boundaries of state government authority, and the ability of voting rights groups to file racial gerrymandering cases. “These doctrines and approaches in these cases fundamentally reset the rules of the game,” she said. “In 2030 we will live in a completely different world than we lived in in 2020, and 2020 was not favorable to minority voters at all.”

RECENT SCHOLARSHIP

Robin Craig
March, 2022

"Saltwater Sovereignty: Tribal Marine Management Authority Along the Pacific Coast.” Online Environmental Law Workshop. University of Maryland School of Law, Baltimore, MD.

Daniel Klerman
March, 2022

“Comment on Choi, Erickson, & Pritchard, ‘Coalitions among Plaintiffs’ Attorneys in Securities Class Actions’,” Conference on Empirical Legal Studies, Virtual, Toronto, ON, Canada.

Robin Craig
March, 2022

“Who’s on First? The Mind-Blowing Attempt to Conceptualize Deference in the Midst of Decision Delays and Agency Repeals,” J.B. and Maurice C. Shapiro Environmental Law Symposium for the George Washington University School of Law, Virtual, Washington, D.C.