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Lecturers in Law

Jessica Price

Jessica Price

Lecturer in Law

Last Updated: Thursday, December 1, 2016

699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA

Jessica G. Price has dedicated her career to civil rights and constitutional law practice. She has served as a sexual violence/ sexual harassment Appeal Body Chair and as a staff attorney at the ACLU of Southern California. She has worked on educational equity, language access, police practices, government surveillance and jail conditions. She successfully litigated on behalf of English Learner schoolchildren throughout the state of California. She represented a member of a tagging crew against a criminal gang injunction that would have precluded him from lawfully selling his artwork, settled litigation on behalf of all inmates in the Los Angeles County jails with mobility impairments, and negotiated for Muslim prison inmates to have access to prayer services.

Price revised training policies for the Barstow Police Department on potential law enforcement responses to individuals’ refusal to identify themselves, and she has developed and delivered training for Los Angeles County jail staff on the Americans with Disabilities Act. She also drafted the first school district-based toolkit for English learner advocates, and she co-authored the publication “Opportunity Lost: The Widespread Denial of Services to California English Learner Students.” Most recently, she successfully sued for the safe and immediate provision of travel documents to allow the return of a United States citizen whose travel documents were confiscated in Dubai, and she initiated litigation against the Anaheim city and Sacramento county governments concerning the secrecy of their use of dragnet cell phone surveillance devices. In 2015 she received the California Lawyer Attorney of the Year award.

Price graduated from Harvard Law School and graduated with Honors from Yale College. She served as the student representative on the Yale College Council’s Police Advisory Board. After college, she worked as a Public Benefits Advocate at the Legal Assistance Foundation of Chicago. At Harvard, she was an editor for the Harvard Civil Rights/ Civil Liberties Law Review. She was also Co-Chair of La Alianza, a Latino student and professional organization, she became a Congressional Hispanic Caucus Scholar. She also won first place in the Negotiation Challenge, an international negotiation competition in Leipzig, Germany. After law school, she moved to New Orleans to serve as a judicial law clerk for the Honorable Eldon E. Fallon in the Eastern District of Louisiana. The following year, she clerked for the Honorable Dorothy W. Nelson of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.


Buzzfeed News
March 18, 2018
Re: Niels W. Frenzen

Niels Frenzen was quoted on the lower evidentiary standard for arresting someone based on immigration status instead of a criminal act. The majority of immigration arrests in the United States are warrantless arrests, Frenzen said. "I don’t know if that is the case with this recent arrest in San Diego, but if CBP really had evidence that she was involved in a transnational human smuggling operation of some kind, that would definitely be a case where CBP would seek to criminally prosecute first and deport second," Frenzen said. "So the fact that CBP has arrested her on the civil law violations suggests that CBP does not have enough evidence to convince a judge to issue a criminal arrest warrant."


Robert K. Rasmussen
January, 2018

"Puerto Rico and the Netherworld of Sovereign Debt Restructuring," Workshop, Duke Law School, Durham, NC. 

Pauline Aranas
January, 2018

Pauline Aranas participated on a panel on "Effective Assessment:  Measuring Your Law Library's Impact" at the Association of American Law School's Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

Pauline Aranas
January, 2018

Pauline Aranas concluded her year-year term on the Executive Committee of the Association of American Law School's Section on Law Libraries and Legal Information.