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Lecturers in Law

Nathan O'Malley

Nathan O'Malley

Lecturer in Law

Last Updated: Thursday, May 18, 2017

699 Exposition Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90089-0074 USA

Nathan O’Malley is a partner with Gibbs Giden Locher Turner Senet & Wittbrodt in Los Angeles. His practice focuses on international arbitration and dispute resolution. Prior to practicing in Los Angeles, O’Malley worked in Europe for over eleven years where he was an associate and partner with several Dutch law firms.

O’Malley has acted in numerous international arbitrations, and represented clients before arbitral tribunals seated in The Hague, Geneva, Zurich, London, Amsterdam, Singapore, Abu Dhabi, Frankfurt am Main and in the United States. He has represented clients in matters which were subject to the laws of civil and common law jurisdictions as well as Islamic law and international treaties. Reflecting his experience in the field, O’Malley has also been appointed as an international arbitrator (neutral) by the Paris-based ICC International Court of Arbitration and the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague on multiple occasions, including in disputes between governmental parties and private entities. Recently, he served as the sole arbitrator in a dispute arising out of a World Bank-financed infrastructure project in an African state.

O’Malley also serves as an adjunct professor at the USC Gould School of Law, where he teaches courses on international business dispute resolution. He is the USA – Western Regions correspondent for the well-known journal, The International Construction Law Review, and has authored a leading text on international arbitration procedure entitled The Rules of Evidence in International Arbitration: An Annotated Guide (Routledge/Informa, London).


Buzzfeed News
March 18, 2018
Re: Niels W. Frenzen

Niels Frenzen was quoted on the lower evidentiary standard for arresting someone based on immigration status instead of a criminal act. The majority of immigration arrests in the United States are warrantless arrests, Frenzen said. "I don’t know if that is the case with this recent arrest in San Diego, but if CBP really had evidence that she was involved in a transnational human smuggling operation of some kind, that would definitely be a case where CBP would seek to criminally prosecute first and deport second," Frenzen said. "So the fact that CBP has arrested her on the civil law violations suggests that CBP does not have enough evidence to convince a judge to issue a criminal arrest warrant."


Robert K. Rasmussen
January, 2018

"Puerto Rico and the Netherworld of Sovereign Debt Restructuring," Workshop, Duke Law School, Durham, NC. 

Pauline Aranas
January, 2018

Pauline Aranas participated on a panel on "Effective Assessment:  Measuring Your Law Library's Impact" at the Association of American Law School's Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

Pauline Aranas
January, 2018

Pauline Aranas concluded her year-year term on the Executive Committee of the Association of American Law School's Section on Law Libraries and Legal Information.